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This image is a diagram for building the weather vane.

You'll need these materials:
a long wooden dowel (about the size of a broom stick)
an aluminum pie plate
a 12 inch long piece of wood (A sturdy ruler would work)
nails
a metal washer
hammer
glue
small saw (or serrated knife)
wire (for mounting)
scissors (strong enough to cut aluminum)

Begin with the 12 inch piece of wood. Use the small saw (or serrated knife) to cut a vertical slit at each end of the stick. The slit should be about one half inch deep. At the midpoint (exactly halfway) of the top of the stick, hammer one nail all the way through the stick. Then turn the wood around the nail several times until the stick turns easily around the nail.

Refer to the pattern picture and cut the head and tail from the aluminum plate. Glue the head into the slot at one end of the wooden stick. Glue the tail into the other end. Allow time for the glue to dry before you take the vane outside.

Attach the weather vane to the long wooden dowel by placing the metal washer on the end of the dowel and then hammering the nail through the wooden stick and into the wooden dowel. (Refer to the picture.) Make sure that the vane moves freely and easily around the nail.

Now you are ready to mount your weather vane outside. If you mounted your rain gauge on a fence, you may want to mount your weather vane near it. Position the wooden dowel beside the fence and secure it with wire. Try to get the vane as high above the fence as you can while still keeping the dowel steady and secure.

The head of the pointer will always point to the direction from which the wind is blowing. For example, if the head points to the NorthEast, then the wind is blowing from the NorthEast. It's as simple as that. (A common mistake is to think that the wind is blowing toward the NorthEast.) Record your wind direction readings in your weather journal.

 
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