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Should we...

T o r n a d o ?   T o r n a d o n ' t !

 
Surrender, Dorothy!

Tornadoes are extremely violent local storms that form when a whirling vortex of air develops inside of a severe thunderstorm and lowers to the ground. You'll recognize a tornado by its distinctive funnel cloud shape. A rapidly spinning vortex of air, extending to the ground, a tornado produces the fastest wind on Earth—in extreme cases, greater than 250 miles per hour. Tornadoes can appear any time of year, but are most common during the spring and summer months.

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Because tornadoes form and strike so quickly, RADAR images don't really help to forecast tornadoes far in advance. However, the velocity mode of Doppler RADAR usually gives ten to fifteen minute warnings for those in the path of a developing tornado. The best evidence of a tornado is often the devastation and destruction on the ground. The wicked winds of strong tornadoes will destroy anything in their path. The resulting destruction is the storm's signature.

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Tornado! (1192k)

 
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