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Th-marvelous...

T h u n d e r f u l

 
Someone's bowling up there

Thunderstorms form when there are great air temperature differences between layers of the atmosphere. Most common during the spring and summer months, thunderstorms form when warm, moist air near the ground rises to great heights. The rising air cools and, eventually, the moisture in the air (water vapor) condenses, forming a towering raincloud. You'll recognize a thunderstorm by the sound of its thunder, the rain showers, wind, lightning, and, sometimes, hail.

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More about Thunderstorms

RADAR images show the location and severity of thunderstorms. Meteorologists can track and forecast the movement of a thunderstorm.

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Thunder! (1365k)

 
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