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Watch out for...

E v e n t u a l   W e a t h e r

 
Basically, meteorologists use technology to look for these kinds of weather. There are, of course, some variations, but if you can use RADAR, satellite images, and lightning detectors to recognize these weather phenomena, you should succeed as a forecaster.

Use satellite images and RADAR reflectivity and velocity images to watch for hurricanes. If you see a spiral formation, a calm area at the center of the spiral, and a band of severe thunderstorms, expect a hurricane.

When RADAR shows no precipitation and satellite images show no clouds, don't worry. You can forecast a clear day, everyone's favorite forecast.

RADAR reflectivity images are ideal for tracking showers. You'll see the location and use the color codes to read the intensity of the precipitation.

Your biggest challenge will be to forecast where a tornado may form. RADAR velocity images can help pinpoint which thunderstorms are most likely to spawn a tornado. The destruction is the best evidence.

Like liquid precipitation, use RADAR reflectivity images to identify the location and intensity of snow showers. Keep an eye on the temperature, too.

Rain reflects RADAR quite nicely, making rain just about the easiest kind of precipitation to track. RADAR reflectivity images pinpoint the location of rain quite well.

Follow the fog recipe for predicting the appearance of ground-based clouds. Conditions need to be right: the air temperature must fall to the dewpoint and the ground must be moist.

RADAR reflectivity and velocity images track the location and severity of thunderstorms which form when there are substantial air temperature differences between layers of the atmosphere.

Recognize a cold front by the line of clouds and precipitation that often accompany it. RADAR and satellite images can show the location and intensity of a cold front.

On RADAR images, severe thunderstorms can resemble common thunderstorms. Pay close attention to the color key which will show the severity of the storm.

 
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