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Hurricanes are huge storms of moist air that form over the warm tropical oceans. They feature heavy rain and fierce winds of speeds of 75 miles per hour or higher. Hurricanes can also bring severe thunderstorms and tornadoes along for fun. Summer and early autumn is considered hurricane season because hurricanes feed on hot, humid air. Hurricanes develop and grow over warm ocean waters and need the warmth and moisture of the water to survive. When a hurricane hits coastal land, it hits hard with heavy rain, thunderstorms, flooding, and wild winds. Over land, the hurricane is fighting to stay alive, a fierce struggle it is destined to lose. Without the warm ocean water beneath, the hurricane will die.

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More about Hurricanes

Meteorologists track hurricanes using satellite images and, when the hurricane is close to land, RADAR reflectivity and velocity images. A RADAR image of a hurricane shows the typical spiral formation, bands of severe thunderstorms, and the calm, central eye of the storm.

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Hurricanes on The Horizon (1541k)

 
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