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National Science Education Standards


"The National Science Education Standards present a vision of a scientifically literate populace. They outline what students need to know, understand, and be able to do to be scientifically literate at different grade levels" (NSES, 2006). Girl Scout volunteers play an important role in science education. By encouraging girls and adults to explore science at Girl Scout gatherings, volunteers nurture the natural curiosity and observation skills of future generations of scientists. National Science Partnership (NSP) activities address many of the science education standards. For a detailed chart, click the appropriate links below.

K-4 Science Standards Addressed in Science Wonders for Brownie Girl Scouts

K-4 Science Standards Addressed in Space Explorer for Brownie Girl Scouts

K-8 Science Standards Addressed in Weather Watch for Junior Girl Scouts

K-8 Science Standards Addressed in Science Sleuth for Junior Girl Scouts

Visit books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=4962&page=R1 to read the complete online version of the National Science Education Standards.


This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants 0436249, MDR #8751820, and MDR #91-55285. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


Resources for Science Learning at The Franklin Institute, Copyright 2007 The Franklin Institute, 220 North Twentieth Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19103, 215-448-1200, webteam@www.fi.edu