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IRELAND: IRISH SPORTS

Very popular in Ireland are horse racing, soccer, and rugby, but there are three uniquely Irish games: hurling, camogie, and Gaelic football.

Hurling is something like hockey.  Many claim that it is the fastest game in the world.  Players use a curved stick to strike a tiny hard ball.  The ball may also be thrown or kicked through the H shaped goal. There are two ways of scoring.  A "point" is scored when the ball is played over the crossbar between the posts.  A "goal" is scored when the ball is played over the goal line, between the posts, but under the crossbar.  A goal is equal to three points.

Hurling has been around in Ireland for many years.  During the 14th century, English soldiers in Ireland were forbidden by law from playing in hurling matches because it was too distracting to them.  They could not concentrate on their jobs.

Camogie is hurling for women.  It is very popular.  Scoring is the same, but a lighter stick is used.

Gaelic football is a cross between soccer and rugby.  There are 15 men on a team.  They try to propel the ball through the goal which also looks like an H.

Now try to solve these problems.

1. In a hurling match, the Greens beat the Oranges in a score of 14 to 11.  If the Greens scored twice as many goals as the Orange, but 2 less points, how many goals and points did each team score?  Remember--a goal is worth 3 points.

2. In a group of 15 boys, 2 play rugby, soccer, and hurling.  3 play soccer and hurling.  2 play rugby and soccer.  2 play hurling and rugby.  The rest are divided equally among rugby, soccer, and hurling.  Make a Venn diagram to display this information.

3. Hugh plays Gaelic football.  The coach gave out a practice schedule for September.  On the even days, practice would be 1 hour and on the odd days, practice would be 2 hours.  There would be no practice on Sundays.  If September started on a Monday, how many hours of practice would they have?

4. Tim played 2 soccer matches in one day.  The first lasted 1 1/2 hours with a 30 minute break.  the second lasted 1 3/4 hours with a 45 minute break.  How many hours and minutes is this in all?

5. Sheila is on the camogie team, but she also plays the flute.  Her camogie practice time varies from day to day, but she must practice her flute for 45 minutes.  If these are the amounts of time she has every day for both, how much of this time can she practice camogie?
Monday--1 3/4 hours; Tuesday--2 hours; Wednesday--2 1/2 hours; Thursday--1 1/2 hours; Friday--2 hours.

Irish Sports Solutions

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