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Caught in The Web

Hillside Elementary School

This month, we've caught Hillside Elementary School in the web. Located in Cottage Grove, Minnesota, USA, Hillside has continually impressed us with their enthusiastic, innovative approach to the Internet. It takes courage for a school and its administration to embrace a new technology. Hillside seems to get its strength from Mrs. Christine Collins, a sixth grade teacher and Internet pioneer. Blazing a trail across the educational wilderness of the World Wide Web, Christine has been leading her students and fellow faculty members to the valuable resources on the Internet. As early as last Spring, her students were already publishing their work on the Web. Their research projects, covering topics as diverse as Antarctica, basketball, dinosaurs, and virtual reality, truly set an example of what kids could do on the Web.

Christine's connection to the Internet goes through the University of Minnesota's College of Education. The Hillside Elementary Homepage sits on a machine at the University. The college's Web66 is well-known in the online educational community as a "cookbook" for getting started. This valuable affiliation is obviously a key to Hillside's great success.

Another key to Hillside's success is the enthusiasm and talent of the students who work with Mrs. Collins. Jummy, Ryan, and Max are just a few of the talented young Internet enthusiasts at Hillside. They've mastered the basics of the Web, completed online research projects, and are moving onto bigger and better things, like making Quicktime movies.

Max has already made a movie, using Adobe Premiere, that is available online. His earthquake movie features great opening credits and a cool demonstration of an earthquake, complete with the destruction of miniature houses. The 4 megabyte movie is definitely worth watching. (Max still has to work on his bandwidth conservation skills.)

Besides fame on the Internet, Max is getting attention in the print media as well. A story about him appeared in the "USA Today." Keep your eye on Max. He's a young man bound for glory.

Visit the Hillside Elementary School Homepage.


Who will be "Caught in The Web" next month? Feel free to send us suggestions.


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