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inQuiry Almanack

[ Spotlighting | Minutes from ME | Wired@School | inQuiry Attic | Great Dates ]

October, 1998
volume four, issue eight

It depends on where you live, but for many people, October is a month filled with glorious colors. As the season changes from Summer to Autumn, nature paints a landscape of golden browns, reds, and oranges. What a perfect time to consider color. The "Spotlight" this month features resources for exploring light and its beautiful by-product, color.

Again, it depends on where you live, but October is often a blustery month with winds blowing strongly. Most people try to avoid strong winds, but two famous brothers, Orville and Wilbur Wright, actually created a machine to make strong wind. Their wind tunnel is the subject of this month's edition of "inQuiry Attic."

Three teachers who are "Wired@School" are sharing their perspectives on how the web can support classroom practice. Interested in earth science? Tammy Payton's "Rock Hounds" offers an online unit for primary grades. Thinking about flight? Try Paulette Dukerich's "Forces of Flight" resource for middle school students. Wondering why to bother using the web in school? Michael Lipinski shares his perspective.

ME's minutes this month continue to explore how pre-readers can best use computer technology to develop their critical thinking skills.

Don't forget to celebrate the "Great Dates" in October. You'll find resources for the holidays as well as for everyday.


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