The Franklin Institute's Resources for Science Learning x
Home (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)For Learners (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)For Educators (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)Leadership (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)Partnership (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)About Us (Main Navigation - Resources for Science Learning @ The Franklin Institute)

BioPoint

Invasive Procedures

Last month, the "BioPoint" students dissected preserved crayfish specimens. The crayfish was the first in a series of upcoming dissections. By understanding the anatomy of one specimen, the process becomes easier for others. Below, one student shares images and notes from the experience.

From a "BioPoint" student's point-of-view...

The underside of the crayfish
On the underside of the crayfish, notice the long chelipeds that have large pincers called chelea.

Image of student working in lab
To begin, carefully use a forcep and your fingers to open the crayfish.

Display of the parts
The crayfish's external anatomy has many parts: the compound eye, antennae, antennules, rostrum, walking leg, cheliped, swimmeret, uropod, and telson.

Closeup of internal structure
After opening the crayfish and pinning it in place, the internal anatomy is revealed.

Image of a petri dish
Placed in a petri dish, the open stomach of the crayfish is dark because there is still food inside.

Image of student working in lab
Mrs. Mazen helps us identify some of the crayfish's parts.

Image of student working in lab
It can be tricky to separate each part without damaging them.

Image of student working in lab
We used a dissecting microscope to observe the gills and other parts of the crayfish.

Image of student working in lab
As in any laboratory activity, we wore gloves for protection while dissecting the crayfish.

Image of students in lab
We used the forceps to grab and move each of the tiny parts of the specimen.

Image of students in lab
The scalpel is also helpful for separating and placing small parts.

Image of students in lab
We also had to keep a pencil nearby to make notes about the parts we identified.


BioPoint Scrapbook

Archive of "BioPoint" Issues


GO Back to inQuiry Almanack